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Puto Recipe (Steamed Rice Cake)
Feb25

Puto Recipe (Steamed Rice Cake)

Puto is an all-time merienda in the Philippine cuisine derived from the Southern Indian dish Puttu. It is eaten as is or with butter or as an accompaniment to Dinuguan. Puto is a classic steamed Filipino rice-cake shaped like an American muffin and it’s so fluppy! Puto is traditionally white, but you can add food color to make it pink, violet, green and yellow. There are many regional variations of puto. Some puto has cheese on top or salted egg (itlog na maalat). There are also what we call puto bumbong (most popular during Christmas season, a purple rice cake cooked inside bamboo tubes called “bumbong”, served or spread with butter or margarine, shredded coconut and sugar), puto maya (steamed glutinous or sticky rice and coconut milk) and puto seko (you can buy this in grocery, it’s like a Filipino candy). Here’s how to make a classic puto:     Servings: 3 dozen Preparation Time: 20 mins Cooking Time: 30 mins   Ingredients 4 cups all-purpose flour 2 1/2 cups water 2 cups sugar 1/2 cup butter, melted 2 1/2 tbsp baking powder 1 cup evaporated milk Cheese-cut into small pieces 1 egg   Cooking Procedure Combine all dry ingredients (flour, sugar, and baking powder) in a mixing bowl. Mix well Add butter, evaporated milk, egg, water and mix all ingredients thoroughly. Grease the puto molds; pour mixture in molds or small cupcake pans. Prepare the steamer. Pour the water in the steamer. Put the molds in the steamer and steam for 20 minutes. Put cheese on top of the mixture. Steam until a toothpick inserted in the center of one of the putos comes out clean, about 10 minutes. Remove the puto from the molds. Cool on a wire rack and serve warm or at room temperature.   Enjoy your merienda with Dinuguan! A delicious afternoon delight!...

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Dinuguan Recipe (Pork Blood Stew)
Jan28

Dinuguan Recipe (Pork Blood Stew)

Dinuguan needs no explanation or justification on why it tastes so good despite what it looks like. People judge this food even before tasting it but if you love Filipino dishes, this one is a must-try! Dinuguan is a Filipino savory stew/blood pudding stew of meat and/or offal (typically lungs, kidneys, intestines, ears, heart and snout), sometimes called chocolate meat because it is simmered in a rich, spicy dark gravy of pig blood that has a thick chocolate-like color and consistency with garlic, long green pepper and vinegar. Not everyone eats dinuguan; there are some religious groups that do not eat animal blood like the Iglesia Ni Cristo. The name “dinuguan” came from the Filipino word “dugo”, which means blood. Similarly, in Ilocano, “dinardaraan” is derived from the word “dara”, which also means blood. However, dinuguan has more liquid while dinardaraan is drier. Dinuguan can also be served without using any offal; you can replace it with chicken or your preferred cuts of meat. In some parts of the Philippines, they even say that chicken dinuguan is more delicious than pork dinuguan. Well, for me, I love the dinuguan that uses offal; I think it is more traditional and I find it surprising with every bite of meat, wondering what part I am eating. Try to cook it on your own using this simple home recipe:     People to feed: Family 4-5 Preparation Time: 10 mins Cooking Time: 50 mins   Ingredients Pork loin : 500 grams, cut into cubes Brown sugar : 1 1/2 tablespoon Garlic : 1 tablespoon, minced Cooking oil : 1 tablespoon Onion : 1 medium sized, chopped finely Pork blood : 10 oz Long green pepper : 2 pieces Water : 1 cup Vinegar : 1 cup Black ground pepper   Cooking Procedure: Sauté the garlic and onion in a pan Add the pork belly, salt, black ground pepper and stir fry for about 10 minutes under medium heat (You can add a beef/pork cube to make it tastier). Add a cup or two of water. Simmer until the water is almost gone to tenderize the meat Add the pork blood and mix well. Let this simmer for 10 minutes while stirring occasionally. Add the vinegar and simmer for 15 minutes without stirring. Put the brown sugar followed by the long green pepper and simmer for 2 minutes or until the sauce gets thick. Transfer to a serving plate, serve hot.     Dinuguan is usually served with white rice or a Philippine rice cake called Puto Recipe (Steamed Rice Cake). Enjoy your meal and share us your eating experience! Happy eating!...

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