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Quick and easiest way to PEEL Potatoes
Aug05

Quick and easiest way to PEEL Potatoes

Save a month of your life. This tip will ease you from removing the skin of a potato with less risk of getting in hurt. No need to use knife. You just need 1 boiling pot and 1 bowl filled with ice water then you’re good to go.

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Grilled Stuffed Squid
Aug04

Grilled Stuffed Squid

Grilled stuffed squid is a perfect summer dish; the smell of the freshly lit charcoal, the aroma of the spices, and the taste of the squid just right for a fun sunny weather. Philippines is surrounded with bodies of water so it’s not hard to find a medium to large sized squid. Since the marinade is already flavourful, you can cook this squid without putting any stuffing. You have to cook the squid just right because once you overcook the squid, it will be as hard as rubber – and if you under cook it, you get a hot, watery mess. You can fill the squid with a mixture of tomatoes, red onions, and ginger (drizzle the vegetable mix with olive oil), seasoned with salt and pepper – then wrapping it in foil generously coated with oil. So are you ready to fire up the grill?   People to feed: 4-5 Preparation Time: 1 hr 20 mins Cooking Time: 15 mins   Ingredients 2 large squid 4 pieces garlic, minced 3 pcs medium sized onion, diced 3 pcs medium sized tomato, diced 1/2 cup Sprite or 7 Up 1/2 cup soy sauce 3 tbsp lemon juice salt and pepper to taste 1 long green pepper, sliced (optional)   Cooking Procedure Clean the squid by holding the tail tube portion of the squid and with fingers grasp the cuttlebone (the thin, clear cartilage inside the tube) and pull from the squid’s body, remove the ink sac by pulling the head. Wash the body cavity under running water and drain. In a large bowl, mix together the soy sauce, lemon juice, soda, pepper and garlic.  Marinate the squid in the mixture for at least one hour and place inside a refrigerator. Prepare the stuffing in a separate bowl by tossing together the  long green pepper, onions and tomatoes. Add salt and pepper and mix them together. Drain the squid and stuff it with the vegetable mixture. Insert the head in the squid body and secure with a toothpick. Warp the squid in a foil drizzled with olive oil. Grill the squid about 6 inches above the charcoal for about 6 minutes on each side. You can use the marinade to baste the squid while it is being grilled. Be careful not to overcook or under cook it. Cut the squid crosswise, and serve hot with your favourite dipping sauce. Serve with rice or as a finger food.   You can try to put these together for your dipping sauce: Soy sauce, lemon juice, red chili pepper and garlic. Happy eating!...

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Penoy (Unfertilized Duck Egg)
Jul21

Penoy (Unfertilized Duck Egg)

Penoy is a popular street delicacy in the Philippines just like balut, actually, they are like twins, when you hear the name of balut the second thing you would think of is penoy. Most of the time it is sold in the streets while sometimes the vendors roam around the town and shout, “Baluuuut, Penoy, Baluuuuuuuuuuut” with a rising and falling intonation, haha, you’ll have an LSS with that. Penoy is an unfertilized duck egg without yolk formation when screened against a lighted candle or electric bulb also known as the candling process. These eggs are kept warm in a rice husk for a few days before boiling. Penoy is different from a balut since the egg is not fertilized and only semi-developed, even after going through the incubation period. It looks like a mass of plain white and yellow embryo that solidifies as you boil the egg.   There are two kinds of penoy: 1.)  The one which is soupy (masabaw) 2.)  The one which is dry (tuyo)   The masabaw is produced by incubating the eggs and putting them in rice hay within 12 days. When you incubate the egg for more than 12 days, it will become tuyo. The masabaw is moist and looks creamy that you can easily gulp while the tuyo looks like an ordinary hard-boiled egg. It’s not that easy to distinguish the masabaw from tuyo penoy because they actually look the same. The vendors put mark in the eggs to distinguish the eggs, usually; it is a vertical line around the shell for the soupy and a horizontal line for the dry. Foreigners must try penoy, it may be not as mainstream as the balut but it is one tasty delicacy that needs to be explored. It is a combination of a yellow slimy flavorful egg yolk with the saltiness of the condiments and the thrill with every bite. Penoy is best eaten while still warm and with a pinch of salt and sometimes vinegar.   See related post Balut or other Street foods...

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Balut (Fertilized Duck Egg)
Jul19

Balut (Fertilized Duck Egg)

A balut is an 18-day-old boiled developing duck embryo commonly sold as a street food in the Philippines and a very common food in Southeast Asia most particularly in Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos. The name “balut” comes from the word ballot which literally means covered/wrapped since it is cooked with its shell. This is best eaten with salt or chili garlic. Some people use vinegar with onions and pepper. Not everyone eats the fetus of balut, some squeamish people cannot eat the chick. I love the broth of balut, I always savour its taste and slowly sip the broth from a small hole before I peel the shell. I love the yellow part of the egg which is the yolk; the white part is kind of hard so not everyone eats that. All of the parts of the egg are edible except for the shell of course.     Nowadays, balut are already being served in fancy restaurants, giving it twists that are really interesting like balut omelet, it can also be served as an appetizer, toppings in adobo and baked pastries’ filling. After eating the balut, I bet you’ll never look at an egg the same way again. The soft bones of the fetus give it a crunchy feeling. This food is high in protein and complex nutrients. In the Philippines, balut eggs are buried in sand and incubated for 17 days, this is the traditional way of cooking balut, though modern incubators are now available for convenience. When the balut eggs are already developed, they will be boiled and sold in the streets carried in a basket by street vendors. It is also a sign of manliness, the grosser the balut looks, the manlier you are if you eat it and this proves your manhood. Balut is considered as a natural Viagra for men. Balut is an aphrodisiac food. The balut is boiled for 30 minutes just like a hard-boiled chicken egg. Balut shall be eaten while still warm. You have to hold the egg firmly and then crack a little hole in the shell and then sip the broth. Peel the shell and you can now enjoy the duck embryo, the egg yolk and the white cartilaginous part. Balut is best eaten at night with a glass of cold beer.   See related post Penoy or other Street foods...

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Siomai Recipe
Jul15

Siomai Recipe

Siomai is originally a Chinese dumpling that made its way to the Filipino hearts. As you can see, there are lots of stalls and restaurants that serve siomai. Actually, there are different varieties of siomai, some use pork, shrimp, beef and vegetable or maybe a mixture of vegetable and meat. You can either steam or fry the siomai, but it is commonly served as steamed siomai. It’s an all-day dish; you can eat this as a snack or with rice. Let’s do it!   People to feed: Servings 5 Preparation Time: 20 mins Cooking Time: 20 mins   Ingredients 3 lbs Ground pork 1 pack Wonton or Siomai wrapper 3 large Onion, minced 3 pieces Carrots, minced 1/4 cup Scallions, minced 1/3 cup Singkamas (jicama), minced 1 cup shrimp, minced 1 can white mushroom, minced 5 tbsp Sesame oil a bunch of chopped spring onions or leeks 1 piece raw egg 2 teaspoons sugar 1 tbsp ground black pepper 2 tsp salt Water for steaming 5 tablespoons oyster sauce (optional)   Cooking Procedure Mix all the ingredients except for the water and wanton wrapper. Mix thoroughly. Wrap the mixed ingredients using the won ton wrapper. Spoon 1 tablespoon of mixture into each wrapper. Fold and seal. Brush steamer with oil and start boiling water. When the water gets to a rolling boil, arrange the siomai in the steamer Steam the wrapped siomai for 20 minutes. The time depends on the size of each individual piece (larger size means more time steaming). Enjoy this with your favourite dipping sauce. You can try combining soy sauce, calamansi/ lemon, sesame oil and chili paste.   Chi fan ba!...

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