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Crispy Kangkong Recipe
May08

Crispy Kangkong Recipe

Crispy Kangkong (Fried Spinach) is made with battered water/river spinach leaves fried until light brown and crispy, usually served as appetizer dipped in a batter. This is a very simple recipe and everybody can do it with less effort and time. It is just like a healthier version of chicharon or pork rinds. This dish is very appealing for children since it is just like a typical vegetable tempura. You can get your children to eat this because once fried, it is just like eating chips with its crispiness and texture plus the dipping. What’s more, it will make you forget that you are eating vegetable added to the fact that it is also a good source of fiber. Basically, all parts of kangkong are edible although the shoot tips and younger leaves are preferred. Water spinach deteriorates rapidly once picked, so a fresh one is ideal to create a good texture and crisp once cooked. Try it! Here are the ingredients you need:   People to feed:Servings 2-3 Preparation Time: 10 mins Cooking Time: 10 mins   Ingredients 4 bunches of kangkong leaves, cleaned 3 cups corn starch 5 cups cooking oil 1 1/2 cup water 1 cup flour 1 pc boiled egg, grated medium Salt and Monosodium glutamate(MSG) to taste(vetsin)   Cooking Procedure  Combine cornstarch, flour, egg, MSG, salt and water ( batter mixture ) in a clean mixing bowl place in the refrigerator while you prepare the kangkong Clean kangkong and draw off leaves thoroughly. Remove leaves from stem. Set aside. Apply the batter mixture until smooth in consistency. Heat enough oil to 250°F and reduce fire to medium. Dip kangkong leaves one by one in batter and deep fry. Wait until its light brown and crispy. Put fried leaves in a plate lined with paper towel to drain oil from kangkong leaves.  Serve with sauce on the side. You can serve this with your favourite dipping sauce and must be served immediately to maintain its crunchiness. Make sure to line paper towels on the serving plate to absorb the excess oil in the kangkong. If you don’t want to serve this with dippings, make sure you season the fried Kangkong with pinch of salt and pepper right after you take it out of the frying pan so they are not bland. You could also sprinkle it with garlic or onion powder and chili pepper if you want or just put basil because basil has a distinctive taste that is good with this dish. Here are some dipping sauce you might wanna try:   Garlic-Mayonnaise Dip Mix all of these below: 1 cup low fat mayonnaise 1 tbsp....

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Crispy Pata Recipe
May02

Crispy Pata Recipe

Crispy pata is a sinful Filipino dish, a very delicious dish made tender by simmering in water along with other spices. With the crispy skin and soft meat consisting of deep fried pig trotters or knuckles, indeed, it is very high in cholesterol.  Pata means Pork Feet in Spanish. It is best served with a soy-vinegar dip. Crispy pata is one of the all-time Filipino favourite dishes usually served in special occasions; it can also be served as beer food or “pulutan” – which is what Crispy Pata is popularly known for. It has a similar reputation as a lamb leg roast or Thanksgiving turkey in the Western World. So, what are you waiting for? Let’s start cooking this very delicious sinful dish.   People to feed: Family 4-5 Preparation Time: 24 hrs Cooking Time: 3 hrs   Ingredients 1 whole Pata (pig’s leg) about 2 kilos, cleaned and knuckles removed 2 tablespoons whole peppercorn 7 pieces dried bay leaves 5 pcs star anise (optional) 10 to 12 cups water 12 cups cooking oil 1 Liter Sprite or 7UP 1 whole Garlic 2 teaspoons ground black pepper 6 teaspoons salt 1/2 cup soy sauce 1/2 cup fish sauce 2 tbsp baking soda   Cooking Procedure Combine soy sauce, fish sauce, 7 up, garlic, baking soda, salt in a deep pot. Now soak the pork leg into the mixture, pierce the skin multiple time with knife to let the marinade seep through. Marinate for at least 24 hours turning to the other side after 12 hrs. Pour water and sprite or 7up in a cooking pot then let boil. Put-in dried bay leaves, whole peppercorn, star anise, and 4 teaspoons of salt. Add the whole pata in the cooking pot then simmer until the leg becomes tender (about an hour). Remove the tender leg from the cooking pot and set aside until the temperature goes down. Let the meat cool for at least an hour, then place in a fridge for at least 2 hours. Rub the leg with garlic, ground black pepper, and remaining salt. Let stand for 15 minutes to absorb the rub. Remove from fridge then prepare a deep fryer or deep pot with cover. Heat a frying pan (must be with cover) and pour-in cooking oil. When the oil becomes hot, deep fry the pork leg. When placing pata in heated oil get your cover ready there will be a lot of hot oil splashing. Cover the pot immediately as it will splatter violently; cook until skin becomes really crunchy and golden brown. Continue cooking in medium heat until one side becomes crispy, and then cautiously...

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Chop Suey Recipe
Apr25

Chop Suey Recipe

Chopsuey or Chop Suey is a recipe comprised of meat (chicken or pork) and seafood (shrimp or fish) cooked with varieties of vegetables. This dish is considered to be of Chinese origin but there are claims that Chopsuey is of American – Chinese origin that was made famous by Chinese immigrants in America. In earlier periods of Chinese history, “chop suey” or “shap sui” in Cantonese, and “za sui” in Mandarin, has the different meaning of cooked animal offal or entrails. Chopsuey literally means “assorted pieces”, consisting of meat (often prawns, chicken, beef, pork or fish) and eggs, cooked quickly with vegetables such as broccoli, bean sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, celery and baby corn, bound in a starch-thickened sauce. It is typically served with rice. Here’s how to cook your own Chinese cuisine:   People to feed: Family 4-5 Preparation Time: 20 mins Cooking Time: 30 mins   Ingredients 2 cup pork, cut into 1-inch cubes 4 to 5 pieces baby corn, halved crosswise 1 small onion, peeled and sliced 1/2 broccoli, cut into florets 1/2 small bell pepper, seeded and cut into strips 1/4 small cabbage, cut into 1-inch thick strips 1 to 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced 1 tablespoon oil 1-1/2 teaspoons corn starch 1/2 cauliflower, cut into florets 1/2 cup evaporated milk Fish sauce Water Salt and pepper to taste   Cooking Procedure Sauté onions and garlic in a pan over medium heat. Add pork and cook, stirring regularly for 10-15 minutes. Add vegetables, baby corn, and fish sauce (you can replace fish sauce with broth cubes to make it less salty), stirring gently to combine, and cook for about 3 to 5 minutes. Thicken the sauce with the cornstarch dispersed in water mixture. In a bowl, combine 1/4 cup of cold water and corn starch and stir until corn starch is dissolved. Add corn starch mixture to pan, stirring gently. Cook for about 1 to 2 minutes or until baby corn and eggs are heated through, vegetables are tender crisp and sauce has thickened. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot.   Chī de hǎo, Qǐng xiǎngyòng.!!!...

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Kare Kare Recipe
Apr20

Kare Kare Recipe

Kare kare is a customary Filipino stew complimented with a thick savoury peanut sauce. This dish is an easy to make Filipino recipe that contains mainly peanut butter beef, banana heart, eggplant and long green beans. The commonly used meats for this dish are ox tail, tripe, and pork leg; on some occasions goat and chicken meat are also used. The tripe (tuwalya), which is the lining of the cow’s first and second stomachs, is as challenging to cook as the oxtail. The tripe needs to be cleaned and blanched thoroughly and it must be cooked for hours to make it tender and edible. So, don’t just sit there, start tenderizing that tripe!   People to feed: Family 6 Preparation Time: 20 mins Cooking Time: 2.5 hrs   Ingredients 300 grams ox tripe (cut in 2 inch slices) you can also use oxtail 250 grams beef chunks 1 liter of water (for boiling meat and oxtail tripe) 3 tablespoons atsuete (dissolve in 1/4 cup of hot water) 1 large onion, chopped 2 tablespoons oil 1 cup ground peanuts 1 piece eggplant (sliced) 1 beef broth cube 1 small banana heart (sliced) 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 bundle of string beans (cut into 3 inch slices) 1/2 cup ground rice 1 head garlic, minced 1/4 teaspoon msg or vetsin 1 bundle of pechay or bok choy   Cooking Procedure Heat up the oil, then put in the achuete seeds for a couple minutes until the oil becomes deep red. Strain out the seeds. (The achuete oil can stain tile counters so be careful not to spill or splatter any oil. Although bleach can remove the stain, you may want to test it first to make sure it will not affect the color of the tiles.) In a large pot, bring the water to a boil Put in the oxtail followed by the onions and simmer for 2.5 to 3 hrs or until tender (35 minutes if using a pressure cooker) Once the meat is tender, add the ground peanuts, peanut butter, and coloring (water from the annatto seed mixture) and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes Add the toasted ground rice and simmer for 5 minutes On a separate pan, sauté the garlic then add the banana flower, eggplant, and string beans and cook for 5 minutes Transfer the cooked vegetables to the large pot (where the rest of the ingredients are) Add salt and pepper to taste Serve hot with shrimp paste. Enjoy!     Shrimp paste is typically served on the side with Kare Kare to add saltiness.  If you think cooking Kare kare is a...

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Pancit Palabok Recipe
Apr14

Pancit Palabok Recipe

Pancit Palabok is a popular Filipino noodle dish with red orange shrimp sauce and topped with several ingredients such as cooked shrimp, tinapa (smoked dried fish) flakes, crushed chicharon, fried garlic, boiled pork, scallions, fried tofu and hard boiled eggs. I love Pancit Palabok since I was a child. There are carinderias near my house that sell pancit palabok together with spaghetti, champorado and sopas during snack time. There are also other noodle dishes that are quite similar to the taste and appearance of Pancit Palabok: Pancit Luglog and Pancit Malabon. Let’s start cooking!   People to feed: Family 6 Preparation Time: 30 mins Cooking Time: 40 mins   Ingredients: 1 pack rice sticks (Bihon noodles) 1/2 lb ground pork 2 tablespoon cooking oil 1 tablespoon anatto powder (atsuete) 1 piece shrimp cube 2 tablespoon fish sauce 6 tablespoon all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 3 cups pork broth   Toppings 1/2 cup tinapa flakes (smoked fish) 1/2 cup cooked shrimps (boiled or steamed) 1/2 cup chicharon (pounded) 2 pieces fried firm tofu (tokwa), cubed 3 tablespoon fried garlic 1 cup boiled pork, thinly sliced and cut into small pieces 1/4 cup green onion or scallions, finely chopped 2 hard boiled eggs,sliced 2 pieces lemon, sliced (or 6 to 8 pieces calamansi)   Cooking Procedure: In a dish, soak the rice noodles in water for about 10 minutes or until softened. Drain well and set aside. In a pot over medium heat, bring about 6 cups water to a brisk boil. Add noodles and cook for about a minute make sure that the noodles are still firm). Drain well. Cook the sauce by heating a saucepan. Pour-in the cooking oil. When the oil is hot enough, put-in the ground pork and cook for about 5 to 7 minutes Dilute the annato powder in pork broth then pour the mixture in the saucepan. Bring to a boil. Stir well until powder is dissolved and water has changed to orange color.  (If you are using anatto seeds, soak them first in 3 tbsp water to bring-out the color). Add the shrimp cube and stir and simmer for 3 minutes Add the flour gradually while stirring.  Season with ground black pepper and fish sauce to taste and then simmer until sauce thickened.  Set aside. Peel shrimp, leaving tail intact. Reserve shrimp heads. In a pot over medium heat, bring 1 cup water to a boil. Add shrimp and cook for about 1 to 2 minutes or until color changes. With a slotted spoon, remove shrimp from pot and set aside. Reserve liquid. Add oil in a medium heat pan. Add tinapa flakes...

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Longganisa Recipe (Native Filipino Sausage)
Apr09

Longganisa Recipe (Native Filipino Sausage)

Longganisa is the Filipino counterpart of chorizos. These cured sausages are famous in almost every Philippine region. The famous varieties of longganisa are : Vigan , Lucban, and Pampanga which were named according to the town that they came from. Longganisa made with native spices and ingredients. Pork is the most common meat used in making this sausage. It is very important that you follow the measurement of the ingredients as stated in the recipe below. Using more than the required ingredients (especially the curing ingredients) is not good. Let’s start cooking!     People to feed: Family 6 Preparation Time: 45 mins Cooking Time: 30 mins   Ingredients 2 1/4 lbs ground pork 2 tbsp paprika (for color) 1 tsp sodium phosphate 6 tbsp garlic, minced 2 tbsp pineapple juice 3 tbsp Anise Liquor 1 tbsp Isolate 1/4 cup TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein) 1/2 tsp Carrageenan 2 tbsp sugar 1/2 tsp Prague powder #1 1/2 tsp meat enhancer (optional) 1/4 cup cold water 1 tbsp coarse salt 1 tbsp ground black pepper   Cooking Procedure In a large container mix the salt, phosphate, Anise liquor, prague powder and water. Add the textured vegetable protein, isolate, and carrageenan Add the ground pork followed by the sugar, garlic, paprika, ground black pepper, pineapple juice, and meat enhancer then mix thoroughly. Place inside the refrigerator for 12 hours. (Note: Take note of the time. The mixture will smell sour if left for more than 12 hours) Shape and Wrap the longanisa individually Using fine cotton kitchen twine, tie the ends of each sausage link tightly and then cut between each link to separate. Place into a glass or plastic container, cover, and allow maturing in the refrigerator for 4 days, after which point they may be frozen. To cook the longanisa, half-fill a large frying pan with water and add thawed sausages. Simmer over medium-high heat about 20 minutes or until the water evaporates. Uncover, and allow the sausages to fry in their own fat about 8 minutes or until golden brown.   Happy eating!...

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