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Batchoy Recipe
Oct20

Batchoy Recipe

Batchoy is a noodle soup dish made from pork entrails, sliced pork and miki noodles. It originated in La Paz, Ilo-ilo City that’s why you can popularly hear the term La Paz Batchoy. You can buy batchoy in carinderia together with pares-pares, bulalo, nilaga and mami. Miki, the noodle used in batchoy is so easy to cook; it can be cooked by just pouring hot water. So what are you waiting for? Let’s start cooking!     People to feed: 4-6 Preparation Time: 15 mins Cooking Time: 30 mins   Ingredients 1 lb pork/ beef 1 chicken breast (bone-in) 1/4 lb pig liver, sliced into strips 1 lb miki noodles, boiled for 1 minute and drained 2 teaspoons sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 piece finely chopped ginger 1/4 cup toasted garlic 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 medium onion, chopped 7 cups water 4 hardboiled eggs 1 lb pig’s intestine; cleaned, boiled, and sliced (optional) Garnish 4 finely chopped green onions 4 tbsp. toasted garlic 1/2 cup coarsely crushed fried pork rinds or 1 cup pork cracklings (chicharon), crushed   Cooking Procedure In a pot, pour water and bring to boil. Add pork, liver and chicken; season with salt and pepper. Cover and cook over high heat for 15 minutes; skim off the fat. Remove the pork, chicken and the liver (let the meat boil for 1-2 hours if you’re using beef); let it cool. Reserve the broth (caldo). Set aside.  By using your hands (or two forks – one to shred the meat and one to hold the bone) shred the pork and chicken meat; discard the bones. Slice the liver thinly. Set aside. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Sauté ginger for 2 minutes. Add onion and garlic; sauté until onion is translucent. Remove from the pan and set aside. Stir-fry the shredded pork and chicken for about 5 minutes, or until lightly brown. Add the sautéed garlic, onion and ginger to the reserved broth in the stockpot and bring to boil. Add fish sauce, sugar and salt and pepper to taste. Cook the noodles. Simmer for about 5 minutes (for fresh noodles) or 10 minutes (for dried noodles), or until noodles are soft. Arranged the cooked miki noodles in a single serving bowl. Place the strips of pork, liver, egg and intestine on top of the miki noodles. Pour the broth in the bowl, and then garnish.   You can also add spleen, kidneys and heart if you want to. Enjoy your meal!  ...

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Penoy (Unfertilized Duck Egg)
Jul21

Penoy (Unfertilized Duck Egg)

Penoy is a popular street delicacy in the Philippines just like balut, actually, they are like twins, when you hear the name of balut the second thing you would think of is penoy. Most of the time it is sold in the streets while sometimes the vendors roam around the town and shout, “Baluuuut, Penoy, Baluuuuuuuuuuut” with a rising and falling intonation, haha, you’ll have an LSS with that. Penoy is an unfertilized duck egg without yolk formation when screened against a lighted candle or electric bulb also known as the candling process. These eggs are kept warm in a rice husk for a few days before boiling. Penoy is different from a balut since the egg is not fertilized and only semi-developed, even after going through the incubation period. It looks like a mass of plain white and yellow embryo that solidifies as you boil the egg.   There are two kinds of penoy: 1.)  The one which is soupy (masabaw) 2.)  The one which is dry (tuyo)   The masabaw is produced by incubating the eggs and putting them in rice hay within 12 days. When you incubate the egg for more than 12 days, it will become tuyo. The masabaw is moist and looks creamy that you can easily gulp while the tuyo looks like an ordinary hard-boiled egg. It’s not that easy to distinguish the masabaw from tuyo penoy because they actually look the same. The vendors put mark in the eggs to distinguish the eggs, usually; it is a vertical line around the shell for the soupy and a horizontal line for the dry. Foreigners must try penoy, it may be not as mainstream as the balut but it is one tasty delicacy that needs to be explored. It is a combination of a yellow slimy flavorful egg yolk with the saltiness of the condiments and the thrill with every bite. Penoy is best eaten while still warm and with a pinch of salt and sometimes vinegar.   See related post Balut or other Street foods...

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Balut (Fertilized Duck Egg)
Jul19

Balut (Fertilized Duck Egg)

A balut is an 18-day-old boiled developing duck embryo commonly sold as a street food in the Philippines and a very common food in Southeast Asia most particularly in Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos. The name “balut” comes from the word ballot which literally means covered/wrapped since it is cooked with its shell. This is best eaten with salt or chili garlic. Some people use vinegar with onions and pepper. Not everyone eats the fetus of balut, some squeamish people cannot eat the chick. I love the broth of balut, I always savour its taste and slowly sip the broth from a small hole before I peel the shell. I love the yellow part of the egg which is the yolk; the white part is kind of hard so not everyone eats that. All of the parts of the egg are edible except for the shell of course.     Nowadays, balut are already being served in fancy restaurants, giving it twists that are really interesting like balut omelet, it can also be served as an appetizer, toppings in adobo and baked pastries’ filling. After eating the balut, I bet you’ll never look at an egg the same way again. The soft bones of the fetus give it a crunchy feeling. This food is high in protein and complex nutrients. In the Philippines, balut eggs are buried in sand and incubated for 17 days, this is the traditional way of cooking balut, though modern incubators are now available for convenience. When the balut eggs are already developed, they will be boiled and sold in the streets carried in a basket by street vendors. It is also a sign of manliness, the grosser the balut looks, the manlier you are if you eat it and this proves your manhood. Balut is considered as a natural Viagra for men. Balut is an aphrodisiac food. The balut is boiled for 30 minutes just like a hard-boiled chicken egg. Balut shall be eaten while still warm. You have to hold the egg firmly and then crack a little hole in the shell and then sip the broth. Peel the shell and you can now enjoy the duck embryo, the egg yolk and the white cartilaginous part. Balut is best eaten at night with a glass of cold beer.   See related post Penoy or other Street foods...

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Siomai Recipe
Jul15

Siomai Recipe

Siomai is originally a Chinese dumpling that made its way to the Filipino hearts. As you can see, there are lots of stalls and restaurants that serve siomai. Actually, there are different varieties of siomai, some use pork, shrimp, beef and vegetable or maybe a mixture of vegetable and meat. You can either steam or fry the siomai, but it is commonly served as steamed siomai. It’s an all-day dish; you can eat this as a snack or with rice. Let’s do it!   People to feed: Servings 5 Preparation Time: 20 mins Cooking Time: 20 mins   Ingredients 3 lbs Ground pork 1 pack Wonton or Siomai wrapper 3 large Onion, minced 3 pieces Carrots, minced 1/4 cup Scallions, minced 1/3 cup Singkamas (jicama), minced 1 cup shrimp, minced 1 can white mushroom, minced 5 tbsp Sesame oil a bunch of chopped spring onions or leeks 1 piece raw egg 2 teaspoons sugar 1 tbsp ground black pepper 2 tsp salt Water for steaming 5 tablespoons oyster sauce (optional)   Cooking Procedure Mix all the ingredients except for the water and wanton wrapper. Mix thoroughly. Wrap the mixed ingredients using the won ton wrapper. Spoon 1 tablespoon of mixture into each wrapper. Fold and seal. Brush steamer with oil and start boiling water. When the water gets to a rolling boil, arrange the siomai in the steamer Steam the wrapped siomai for 20 minutes. The time depends on the size of each individual piece (larger size means more time steaming). Enjoy this with your favourite dipping sauce. You can try combining soy sauce, calamansi/ lemon, sesame oil and chili paste.   Chi fan ba!...

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Isaw Isaw (Pork and Chicken Intestines)
Jul13

Isaw Isaw (Pork and Chicken Intestines)

Isaw is a well-known street food in the Philippines made from pork and chicken intestines that was grilled to perfection. Filipinos love isaw and it can be found in almost everywhere because if the vendors don’t have stalls, they are being sold in moving stalls and the vendors can transfer from one place to another most commonly in front of a business establishment, schools and churches every afternoon up to night. Vendors make sure that the isaw is clean so they turn the intestines inside out and then clean the inner portion again and repeat the process several times (because you know, you wouldn’t want to taste something bitter and regret it for the rest of your life). Isaw is usually eaten after being dipped either in vinegar with onions, vinegar with onions and chili, sweet sauce or spicy sauce or you can just mix whatever you want and it will taste good as you experiment. The most popular isaw here in the Philippines can be found in the University of the Philippines, The UP Isawan wherein they sell a very tasty and clean isaw. Isaw is probably the cheapest finger food you can eat while drinking alcoholic beverages. Let’s start cooking intestines!!! This is so exciting! People to feed: Servings 5 Preparation Time: 40 mins Cooking Time: 10 mins   Ingredients 1 lb chicken or pig’s large intestine (well cleaned) 1/2 cup vinegar 2 tablespoon whole peppercorn 2 tablespoon Salt 4 to 6 pieces Dried Bay leaves 4 cups Water 1/2 cup Ketchup 2 tablespoon Soy sauce 2 tablespoon Cooking oil   Cooking Procedure Boil water in a cooking pot and put the salt, whole pepper corn, and dried bay leaves While boiling, make the mixture you need for grilling, cooking oil, soy sauce and ketchup. Add the intestines then simmer for a few minutes. Add vinegar then simmer up to 30 minutes or until the intestines are tender. Set aside until the temperature goes down. Cut the pork intestines crosswise about 1 inch in length  and about 6 inch in length for the chicken intestines. Skewer the intestine (about 3 to 4 pieces per skewer) Grill the intestine while basting with the mixture of cooking oil, ketchup, and soy sauce. Serve the Isaw with your sweet sauce or vinegar dipping.   Try this popular bizarre food from the Philippines and tell us what you think about it....

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Betamax (Grilled Chicken/Pork Blood)
Jul11

Betamax (Grilled Chicken/Pork Blood)

Okay, I will now reveal to everyone, my deepest secret, I love blood! Well, basically because, yeah, you’re right, I am a vampire! Hahaha, nah, I’m just kidding. We’ll use chicken/pork blood this time. But, why not? If I can have eternal youth and be forever young. I’ll eat Betamax every day. Isn’t it weird that you can grill something in liquid form? Like blood? Maybe you’re wondering how that happened but this recipe will prove to you that it’s possible. Betamax is a popular street food in the Philippines sold together with isaw and atay (liver). So, how did it happen? We all know that blood coagulates right? So when you extract blood from the chicken and leave that in an open jar, it will cool down and the texture will somehow become gelatinous and then scalded. The coagulated blood is now in solid form so it is possible to cut it into rectangular pieces just like the Betamax tape, so now you know why it’s called Betamax, Haha, because it looks like VHS tape. These blocks were skewered in bamboo sticks usually 3 pieces per stick and you can buy if for only 5 pesos. Actually, it doesn’t really have a taste, it’s chewy and you have to dip it in vinegar, that’s where it gets its taste. Have you tried one? Make your own now! People to feed: Servings 5 Preparation Time: 2 hrs Cooking Time:  10 mins   Ingredients 1 cup Chicken blood 1 teaspoon Salt 1 teaspoon Pepper 5 cups water 2 teaspoon Oil 2 teaspoon Soy sauce 1/2 cup Ketchup   Cooking Procedure Combine the chicken blood, salt and pepper in bowl. Boil 5 cups of water and pour in the mixture. Drain the water when the blood thickens. Let it cool. Cut into cubes and skewered. Grill the blood over a charcoal stove for 10 minutes while basting with the mixture of oil, ketchup and soy sauce and let the flavour be absorbed.   Share with your friends! Make sure you prepare a vinegar dip!...

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