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Penoy (Unfertilized Duck Egg)

Penoy is a popular street delicacy in the Philippines just like balut, actually, they are like twins, when you hear the name of balut the second thing you would think of is penoy. Most of the time it is sold in the streets while sometimes the vendors roam around the town and shout, “Baluuuut, Penoy, Baluuuuuuuuuuut” with a rising and falling intonation, haha, you’ll have an LSS with that. Penoy is an unfertilized duck egg without yolk formation when screened against a lighted candle or electric bulb also known as the candling process. These eggs are kept warm in a rice husk for a few days before boiling. Penoy is different from a balut since the egg is not fertilized and only semi-developed, even after going through the incubation period. It looks like a mass of plain white and yellow embryo that solidifies as you boil the egg.

 

There are two kinds of penoy:

1.)  The one which is soupy (masabaw)

Penoy

2.)  The one which is dry (tuyo)

Penoy

 

The masabaw is produced by incubating the eggs and putting them in rice hay within 12 days. When you incubate the egg for more than 12 days, it will become tuyo. The masabaw is moist and looks creamy that you can easily gulp while the tuyo looks like an ordinary hard-boiled egg. It’s not that easy to distinguish the masabaw from tuyo penoy because they actually look the same. The vendors put mark in the eggs to distinguish the eggs, usually; it is a vertical line around the shell for the soupy and a horizontal line for the dry.

Foreigners must try penoy, it may be not as mainstream as the balut but it is one tasty delicacy that needs to be explored. It is a combination of a yellow slimy flavorful egg yolk with the saltiness of the condiments and the thrill with every bite.

Penoy is best eaten while still warm and with a pinch of salt and sometimes vinegar.

 

See related post Balut or other Street foods

 

Summary
Article Name
Penoy (Unfertilized Duck Egg)
Description
Penoy is a popular street delicacy in the Philippines just like balut, actually, they are like twins, when you hear the name of balut the second thing you would think of is penoy. Most of the time it is sold in the streets while sometimes the vendors roam around the town and shout, “Baluuuut, Penoy, Baluuuuuuuuuuut” with a rising and falling intonation, haha, you’ll have an LSS with that.
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Author:

My mission for this site is simple: to compile all recipes from different countries and to let everyone have the chance to explore and taste the goodness of a variety of dishes wherever you are in the world. With that being said, I am hoping that everyone would share their own stories and give their insights on how they make each recipe better and

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